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NCJ Number: 118746 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: What Should the Role of Law Enforcement Be in the Societal Response to the AIDS Epidemic by the End of the Twentieth Century?
Author(s): G W Winters
Corporate Author: California Cmssn on Peace Officer Standards and Training
United States of America
Date Published: 1988
Page Count: 94
Sponsoring Agency: California Cmssn on Peace Officer Standards and Training
Sacramento, CA 95816
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
POST Media Distribution Ctr
Sacramento, CA 95816
Publication Number: 6-0109
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

POST Media Distribution Ctr
1601 Alhambra Boulevard
Sacramento, CA 95816
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Best Practice/State-of-the-Art Review
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This research project devised a hypothetical scenario of a large city police department paralyzed by fear of AIDS and established guidelines for law enforcement policymakers to deal with the AIDS issue.
Abstract: The AIDS epidemic offers law enforcement unique challenges in maintaining professionalism and services. If law enforcement personnel are paralyzed by fear for their own safety and the safety of their families, they will not accept the risks considered normal in police work. Police departments in urban areas serving populations of over 250,000 persons are most likely to confront and be affected by the AIDS epidemic on a frequent basis. The strategic plan for such departments is based on a key policy statement that law enforcement must educate and train personnel in the risks of infection by the AIDS virus and must share the knowledge gained with the public. The plan stresses education and support of employees' families, support of uninfected employees who may see some of their coworkers suffer from AIDS, training, continuous monitoring of the work environment, and recognition that employee infections may occur and must be dealt with. Trends evaluated as part of the research effort include funds spent on AIDS activities, political concerns related to AIDS, health care costs, restrictions on civil liberties, and cost of treatment per AIDS patient. Appendixes contain supplemental information on the research project. 106 references, 10 tables, 13 figures.
Main Term(s): AIDS/HIV transmission
Index Term(s): Occupational safety and health; Police agencies; Police policies and procedures
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=118746

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