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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 119480 Find in a Library
Title: Pediatric AIDS: Health and Social Service Needs of Infants and Children
Corporate Author: Experience Education
United States of America
Date Published: 1989
Page Count: 20
Sponsoring Agency: Azimuth Inc.
Fairmont, WV 26554
Experience Education
Omaha, NE 68135
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Publication Number: GA0/HRD-89-96
Sale Source: Azimuth Inc.
1000 Technology Drive, Suite 3120
Fairmont, WV 26554
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Legislative Hearing/Committee Report
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This document provides information on services available to children infected with the HIV virus which causes AIDS.
Abstract: Most HIV-infected children are from low-income and disadvantaged families who have limited access to adequate health care services. As a result, these children and their families rely on public health and social services systems. In some communities, these systems are already overburdened. Consequently, these children are at risk of long and costly hospital stays that tend to reduce the overall quality of life compared to a home environment. In the communities reviewed, foster care, home health care, and support services have been developed or expanded to help reduce the time HIV-infected children spend in the hospital and the resultant health care costs. All communities reported inadequate current capacity to meet the demand for certain services, such as day care, group homes that provide intermediate level care, respite care, mental health counseling, and transportation. Appendix and bibliography.
Main Term(s): Children with AIDS/HIV
Index Term(s): Child welfare
Note: Report to the Chairman, Committee on Finance, U.S. Senate
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=119480

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