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NCJ Number: 119701 Find in a Library
Title: Scholastic Attainment and Employment of Drug Users in Singapore
Journal: Bulletin of Narcotics  Volume:39  Issue:2  Dated:special issue (1987)  Pages:81-87
Author(s): T H Ong
Date Published: 1987
Page Count: 7
Type: Survey
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: Austria
Annotation: This is a study of the educational and employment aspects of drug use in Singapore.
Abstract: A random sample of 100 drug users and 100 non-users individually matched for sex, age, ethnic group, education and neighborhood, were interviewed on the basis of a questionnaire designed to collect data for this study. Results show that the drug users have significantly lower education attainment and poorer scholastic performance than the non-users. The drug users were also found to possess significantly lower career status, higher instability in employment, and greater job dissatisfaction than the non-users. The author suggests that educational and vocational guidance, counselling service, welfare schemes and in-service training must be provided for this group of people. 3 tables and 21 references. (Author abstract modified)
Main Term(s): Drug use
Index Term(s): Drug offenders; Singapore
Note: Special issue on the prevention and reduction of the illicit demand for drugs.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=119701

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