skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 119892 Find in a Library
Title: Aging Youngsters Before Their Time
Journal: Update on Law-Related Education  Volume:7  Issue:2  Dated:(Fall 1983)  Pages:18-21,60-61
Author(s): T Engler
Date Published: 1983
Page Count: 6
Grant Number: 79-JN-AX-0006
Type: Issue Overview
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: In response to increasing public concern about juvenile crime, legislators, prosecutors, and others have begun to re-examine both specific provisions of their State's juvenile codes and the general philosophy of the juvenile justice system.
Abstract: One mechanism for dealing with juvenile violence, the transfer of young offenders from the supposedly more benign juvenile court to the supposedly more punitive world of the adult criminal court, is becoming the focus of renewed attention. As greater numbers of youths are transferred to criminal courts for trial and the scope of transfer laws is expanded, many observers question the fundamental framework of the juvenile and criminal justice systems.
Main Term(s): Juvenile court procedures
Index Term(s): Juvenile designated felonies; Juvenile offenders
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=119892

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.