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NCJ Number: 120090 Find in a Library
Title: Gun Ownership and Willingness To Shoot: A Clarification of Current Controversies
Journal: Justice Quarterly  Volume:6  Issue:2  Dated:(June 1989)  Pages:263-282
Author(s): J T Whitehead; R H Langworthy
Date Published: 1989
Page Count: 20
Type: Survey
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Data from the 1982 ABC News Poll of Public Opinion on Crime are used to examine household gun availability and willingness to shoot a burglar.
Abstract: Findings show some support for similarity between protective and sport ownership, and "fear and loathing" hypothesis, and the impact of region (southern residence) and gender on ownership. The findings also support some of the recent contentions of Hill, Howell, and Driver (1985), although we note two clarifications of their discussion of previous research. Support for the collective security hypothesis, however, was limited; this finding raises a concern for proponents of further restrictions on gun ownership. 4 tables, 4 footnotes, 25 references. (Publisher abstract)
Main Term(s): Gun Control
Index Term(s): Burglary; Covert entry; Public Attitudes/Opinion
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=120090

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