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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 120292 Find in a Library
Title: Prison Crowding: Public Attitudes Toward Strategies of Population Control
Journal: Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency  Volume:25  Issue:2  Dated:(May 1988)  Pages:150-169
Author(s): S E Skovron; J E Scott; F T Cullen
Date Published: 1988
Page Count: 20
Type: Survey
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This research explores public attitudes towards policies designed to reduce prison crowding.
Abstract: Telephone surveys of adult residents of two midwestern cities were used to accumulate the data. The results showed substantial public support for community-based corrections and incentive good time. Shortening sentences and increasing parole board authority showed high levels of public disapproval, while moderate support was given to building new prisons. Two important issues to be examined are how informed the public is on issues concerning prison crowding, and the manner in which policymakers use or respond to public opinion. 4 Tables, 6 Notes, 46 References. (Author abstract modified)
Main Term(s): Public Opinion of Corrections
Index Term(s): Prison overcrowding; Public education
Note: Presented at the annual meeting of the Law and Society Association, Washington, DC, June 11-14, 1987.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=120292

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