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NCJ Number: 126723 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Drug Control: How Drug-Consuming Nations Are Organized for the War on Drugs
Corporate Author: US Government Accountability Office
National Security and International Affairs Division
United States of America
Date Published: 1990
Page Count: 55
Sponsoring Agency: Azimuth Inc.
Fairmont, WV 26554
National Institute of Justice/
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NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Government Accountability Office
Washington, DC 20548
Publication Number: GAO/NSIAD-90-133
Sale Source: Azimuth Inc.
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Fairmont, WV 26554
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National Institute of Justice/
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United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
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Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The US General Accounting Office (GAO) compared the anti-narcotics activities of the United Kingdom, Germany, and Italy for comparison with those in the United States in terms of policies, perspectives, and approaches in the areas of organization and infrastructure, law enforcement, demand reduction, and strategies for international drug control.
Abstract: While the United States is the largest consumer of illicit drugs, the US cocaine market is saturated, encouraging drug traffickers to look to other markets. This has resulted in a growing European use of cocaine and expectations of further growth with the abolition of internal European borders in 1992. In recent years, there has been an agreement among the international community to better coordinate anti-drug efforts under United Nations auspices. In terms of US versus European policy differences, the US is more willing to use military force and conditions military and economic assistance to other countries on evidence of cooperation in the war against drugs. The US, in contrast to European nations, interdicts drugs outside its borders, although international cooperations in this area is increasing. While the US has adopted a centralized approach to the management of its anti-narcotics program, European governments have not seen the necessity to follow suit. The American and various European criminal justice and law enforcement systems differ over definitions of illegal activity and penalties. The aspects of law enforcement discussed by the GAO include use of sting and undercover techniques, money laundering laws, and intelligence collecting and sharing. Both the US and its European allies use a combination of preventive education and addict treatment in their drug demand reduction strategies. However, the US supply reduction strategy focuses on law enforcement efforts delivered through bilateral agreements with source countries, while European countries generally work through multilateral organizations and emphasize economic aid to encourage supply reduction. 4 tables and 6 appendixes
Main Term(s): International drug law enforcement
Index Term(s): Germany; Italy; Policy analysis; United Kingdom (UK); US Government Accountability Office (GAO); US/foreign comparisons
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=126723

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