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NCJ Number: 127266 Find in a Library
Title: Staffing the Nation's Growing Prisons
Journal: Corrections Compendium  Volume:11  Issue:3  Dated:(September 1986)  Pages:1,8-11
Author(s): V Cox
Date Published: 1986
Page Count: 5
Type: Survey
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Guarding the nation's growing prison populations has become more complicated, demanding, and dangerous. Consequently, more and more less-experienced correctional officers are being hired to do the job.
Abstract: Between 1981 and 1985, Federal and State prison populations increased 66 percent, from just under 300,000 to more than 500,000. Total population in State correctional institutions exceeds capacity by 5 to 10 percent; 37 States and the Federal Bureau of Prisons plan to add nearly 59,000 prison beds this year. Correctional training and recruiting is a challenge; the job is low-paying, and staff turnover and budget cuts are rampant. Alabama's Limestone Correctional Facility had 18 escapes in its first 15 months of operation due to the fact that 70 percent of the 184 correctional officers have less than one year experience. During a 4-month period, 40 Idaho Department of Corrections officers resigned to take better paying jobs in neighboring states. California has increased salaries and made other improvements, but more than 60 percent of officers will have had less than one year experience by July 1987.
Main Term(s): Correctional officer training
Index Term(s): Correctional education programs; Correctional personnel; Prison overcrowding
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=127266

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