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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 134296 Find in a Library
Title: Drug Treatment: Despite New Strategy, Few Federal Inmates Receive Treatment
Corporate Author: US Government Accountability Office
Human Resources Division
United States of America
Date Published: 1991
Page Count: 26
Sponsoring Agency: Azimuth Inc.
Fairmont, WV 26554
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Government Accountability Office
Washington, DC 20548
Publication Number: GAO/HRD-91-116
Sale Source: Azimuth Inc.
1000 Technology Drive, Suite 3120
Fairmont, WV 26554
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Inmate drug treatment in correctional institutions operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) was studied using data on the number of Federal inmates needing drug treatment, BOP's strategy for providing drug treatment to them, access to treatment, and costs.
Abstract: Results showed that about half of Federal inmates may need drug treatment, but few are receiving it. As of April 1, 1991, only 364 of the estimated 27,000 inmates with moderate to severe drug abuse problems were receiving treatment in the intensive residential programs and less than half the treatment slots were filled. In addition, aftercare services are not in place. BOP did not conduct an active outreach program to encourage more inmates to receive treatment and only recently has hired an aftercare coordinator. Moreover, services needed by inmates with less serious drug abuse problems are not available in all prisons. Despite the problems being experiences, BOP plans to expand its treatment program, with costs increasing from an estimated $7.2 million in 1990 to $21.8 million in 1992. Recommended actions include an extensive outreach effort and provision for aftercare treatment services for released inmates and for education and counseling services in all prisons. Appended methodological information and tables showing results
Main Term(s): Inmate drug treatment
Index Term(s): Corrections management; Federal Bureau of Prisons; Federal prisoners
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=134296

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