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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 134393 Find in a Library
Title: Computer-Integrated Courtrooms: Moving the Judicial System into the Twenty-First Century
Journal: Trial  Volume:26  Issue:9  Dated:(September 1990)  Pages:50-52
Author(s): M H Block
Date Published: 1990
Page Count: 3
Type: Report (Technical)
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Computer-integrated courtrooms (CIC's) offer trial attorneys the power of computerized searches, reviews, and immediate display of testimony transcripts as a case is being tried.
Abstract: At least 30 courts in the United States have some form of permanent CIC technology in operation or plan to install it. The court reporter's computer-aided transcription (CAT) system underlies and supports the CIC, integrating recent advances in computer technology. Ideally, computer terminals places at counsel tables and the judge's bench can be tied into the court reporter's CAT system. This allows judges, lawyers, and litigants to see English-language text of testimony on their computer monitors moments after it is given. Transcriptions of the proceedings can be printed out for lawyers at the end of each day. Lawyers can also review earlier testimony on their monitors during cross-examination. CIC's make it easier to use the trial transcript as a litigation tool. With proper data base management software, a computer user can flag important statements and have the computer sort them and look for links between them. Related statements can be retrieved easily, even during trial, through a speedy electronic search using names and keywords. Computerization in the courtroom is especially important for deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals. Costs of a permanent CIC installation range from $25,000 to $50,000.
Main Term(s): Automated court systems
Index Term(s): Computer aided operations; Court records; Court reporting; Testimony; Trial procedures
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=134393

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