skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 134709 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Focusing on High-Risk Parolees: An Experiment to Reduce Commitments to the Texas Department of Corrections
Author(s): S Turner; J Petersilia
Corporate Author: Rand Corporation
United States of America
Date Published: 1991
Page Count: 73
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Rand Corporation
Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 87-IJ-CX-0057
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Dataset: DATASET 1
Type: Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Intensive Supervision Parole (ISP), established in Dallas and Houston in 1987 to reduce parole revocations to prison, was evaluated with respect to its implementation and impact on offenders and system and costs.
Abstract: ISP provided more intensive community surveillance of parolees; ISP officers were also encouraged to use intermediate sanctions whenever appropriate when recidivism events occurred. The research used data from 221 parolees in Dallas and 458 parolees in Houston. Data collection for each offender began between August 1987 and July 1988 and continued for 1 year. Results revealed that the overall ISP results were the opposite of what was intended. ISP was not associated with fewer arrests, although ISP offenders received more contacts than offenders who were on routine supervision. ISP was also associated with increased technical violations, particularly in Houston, where the ISP model was implemented more fully. At the end of 1 year, about 30 percent of all ISP participants were in prison, compared to about 18 percent of those on routine parole. ISP supervision also cost 1.7 times the cost of routine parole. However, the ISP program did represent an appropriate intermediate punishment. Therefore, ISP has promise for jurisdictions primarily interested in providing much-needed flexibility in sentencing decisions by imposing an intermediate sanction. However, ISP programs, as currently structured to focus on surveillance rather than treatment, will not reduce recidivism and system costs. Tables, footnotes, appended further analyses and results, and 24 references (Author abstract modified)
Main Term(s): Corrections costs
Index Term(s): Corrections effectiveness; Intensive supervision programs; Parole effectiveness; Parole violations; Texas
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=134709

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.