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NCJ Number: 134997 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Prison Costs: Opportunities Exist To Lower the Cost of Building Federal Prisons
Corporate Author: US Government Accountability Office
General Government Division
United States of America
Date Published: 1991
Page Count: 76
Sponsoring Agency: Azimuth Inc.
Fairmont, WV 26554
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Government Accountability Office
Washington, DC 20548
Publication Number: GAO/GGD-92-3
Sale Source: Azimuth Inc.
1000 Technology Drive, Suite 3120
Fairmont, WV 26554
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
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United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: In response to the Federal Bureau of Prisons prison construction program, that will double its inmate capacity by 1995 at a cost of approximately $3 billion, the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) compared Federal and State prison construction and operating costs to determine how the Federal government could save money on new medium security prisons.
Abstract: Federal medium security prisons opened between 1985 and 1989 cost more per bed to build than comparable State facilities because they accorded each inmate 55 percent more space and housed inmates in single-cells rather than in multiple-occupancy cells or dormitories. Federal prisons also dedicated more space to inmate programs than did State prisons. However, Federal prisons cost less to operate than the State prisons because Federal prison personnel were paid, on average, 5 percent less than State correctional personnel and Federal prisons operated with a 27-percent higher inmate-to-staff ratio. Once the proposed Federal law enforcement pay reform is implemented, differences between Federal and State salaries will be reduced, and Federal prison operating costs will escalate. The GAO recommended several ways in which Federal prison construction costs could be contained: reduce the amount of space provided to inmates, make better use of multipurpose spaces, and locate prisons in lower cost geographic areas. 14 tables, 10 figures, and 5 appendixes
Main Term(s): Construction costs; Prison construction
Index Term(s): Federal Bureau of Prisons; Federal correctional facilities; Prison costs; State correctional facilities
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=134997

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