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NCJ Number: 136607 Find in a Library
Title: Cycle of Violence
Author(s): C S Widom
Date Published: 1992
Page Count: 6
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Dept of Justice NIJ Pub
Washington, DC 20531
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/NCJRS
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF|PDF
Type: Research (Theoretical)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Drawing on data from the disciplines of psychology, sociology, psychiatry, social work, and nursing, this article reviews the current empirical status of the hypothesis of an intergenerational transmission of violence.
Abstract: The review focuses on those aspects of the cycle of violence hypothesis that have received support as well as unresolved questions. Research findings provide strong support for the cycle of violence hypothesis. The experience of child abuse and neglect has a marked impact even on individuals with otherwise little likelihood of engaging in officially recorded criminal behavior. In a direct test of the violence breeds violence hypothesis, physical abuse experienced as a child led significantly to later violent criminal behavior, when other relevant demographic variables were held constant. The findings fail to show that every abused or neglected child will become delinquent, criminal, or a violent criminal. The link between childhood victimization and later antisocial and violent behavior remains far from certain, and the intergenerational transmission of violence is not inevitable. Research efforts need to focus on the processes involved. 3 tables and 37 references
Main Term(s): Criminality prediction; Domestic violence causes
Index Term(s): Child abuse causes; Child emotional abuse and neglect; Psychological victimization effects; Society-crime relationships
Note: NIJ Research in Brief
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=136607

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