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NCJ Number: 141257 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: NOTE ON PERCEPTUAL DETERRENCE, RELIGIOUSLY BASED MORAL CONDEMNATION, AND SOCIAL CONTROL
Journal: Criminology  Volume:31  Issue:1  Dated:(February 1993)  Pages:119-134
Author(s): S R Burkett; D A Ward
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 16
Sponsoring Agency: US Dept of Health and Human Services
Rockville, MD 20892-9304
Grant Number: AA02620
Type: Survey
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Data from a panel study of 428 youths attending two public high schools were analyzed to test the hypothesis that those who condemn an act on religiously based moral grounds are unlikely to contemplate engaging in the behavior.
Abstract: The relationship between perceived certainty and marijuana use was lowest among those who were strongly committed to the belief that marijuana use is a sin. For individuals who express the belief that marijuana use is a sin, the threat of punishment was not related to self-reported use. Legal sanctions were likely to be largely irrelevant as a deterrent among those who held strong, religiously based moral views opposing marijuana use. For individuals who were uncertain or strongly disagreed that marijuana use is a sin, the association between the perceived certainty of punishment and marijuana use was consistent with predictions from deterrence theory. The relationship between perceived certainty and marijuana use was lowest among those strongly committed to the belief that marijuana use is a sin. 5 notes, 4 tables, and 50 references
Main Term(s): Deterrence; Legislative impact
Index Term(s): Behavior modification; Drug abuse; Individual behavior; Religion
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=141257

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