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NCJ Number: 141645 Find in a Library
Title: ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC SLEEP AND MOOD DURING COCAINE WITHDRAWAL (FROM COCAINE: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOPATHOLOGICAL EFFECTS, P 21-45, 1992, ALFONSO PAREDES AND DAVID A GORELICK, EDS.)
Author(s): R A Kowatch; S S Schnoll; J S Knisely; D Green; R K Elswick
Date Published: 1992
Page Count: 25
Sponsoring Agency: Haworth Press, Inc
Binghamton, NY 13904
Sale Source: Haworth Press, Inc
10 Alice Street
Binghamton, NY 13904
United States of America
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study reports on the sleep effects of cocaine on nine patients admitted to an inpatient substance abuse treatment unit.
Abstract: The patients' sleep was studied in the laboratory for four nights during the first week and two nights during the second and third weeks of their hospitalization. Daily mood ratings, cocaine-craving scores, and sleep logs were also recorded on each patient. During the first week of withdrawal, these patients had a markedly shortened rapid- eye-movement (REM) latency, an increased REM sleep percentage, a very high REM density, and a long total sleep period time. During the third week, REM latencies were very short, and total percentage of REM sleep increased. By week three of withdrawal the sleep continuity pattern was similar to that found in chronic insomnia, with a long sleep latency, an abnormally increased total time awake after sleep onset, and a poor sleep efficiency. The subjects' ratings of cocaine craving, total POMS scores, and depression fell precipitously after the first week of withdrawal and were at subclinical levels by week three of withdrawal. 4 tables, 8 figures, and 23 references
Main Term(s): Cocaine; Drug effects
Index Term(s): Biological influences
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=141645

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