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NCJ Number: 141926 Find in a Library
Title: TRENDS IN CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORY AND RESEARCH (FROM KOREAN CRIMINOLOGICAL REVIEW, P 31-58, 1992, KOREAN INSTITUTE OF CRIMINOLOGY, ED. -- SEE NCJ-141924)
Author(s): C Yong Suk
Date Published: 1992
Page Count: 28
Sponsoring Agency: Korean Institute of Criminology
Seoul 137-140, Korea
Sale Source: Korean Institute of Criminology
142 Woomyon-Dong Socho-GU
Seoul 137-140,
Korea, South
Type: Conference Material
Language: English
Country: Korea, South
Annotation: This paper summarizes the major trends in criminological theory and research throughout the world.
Abstract: Descriptions of some criminological perspectives in the United States include clinical criminology, the multiple- factor approach to criminology, the general-theory-builders' position, and the interdisciplinary approach. Also considered are the perspectives of conservative and liberal criminology, social control theories, labeling theories, and radical criminology. A section on "specific trends" addresses victimization surveys and the arguments for the biological and environmental factors in criminal behavior. Trends and ideals in the administration of criminal justice are discussed from cross-cultural perspectives, with attention to a comparison of the American and German justice systems and other criminal law reform movements. The trend analysis concludes that no one theory explains all deviant behaviors. Combinations of theories are most likely to fit the complexity of factors in criminal behavior. Given this complexity, interdisciplinary research is appropriate.
Main Term(s): Crime causes theory; Criminology
Index Term(s): Labeling theory; Radical criminology; Social control theory; Trend analysis
Note: From an international conference on "Crime and Crime Control: Past, Present, and Future," held on October 15-17, 1991.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=141926

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