skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 142039 Find in a Library
Title: CANADIAN MUSLIM WOMEN AND SHARI'A LAW: A FEMINIST RESPONSE TO OH! CANADA!
Journal: Canadian Journal of Women and the Law  Volume:6  Issue:1  Dated:(1993)  Pages:52-65
Author(s): S Khan
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 14
Type: Legislation/Policy Analysis
Format: Article
Language: English; French
Country: Canada
Annotation: This analysis of the status of Muslims in Canada and the proposals by the Canadian Society of Muslims concludes that a new concept of multiculturalism is needed, along with re-education of the media and educators, so that excluded groups such as Muslims can be heard, validated, and included.
Abstract: The media and texts both present stereotypical images that denigrate Muslims, leading to an invalidation of Islam and the marginalization of Muslims. The Canadian Society of Muslims responded to this invalidation by proposing that consenting Muslims be subjected to Muslim Personal Status Laws in Canada. This strategy is inappropriate. In what appears to be an effort to strengthen what it views as the Muslim community against racism, it has called for laws that grant unequal status to women. It thereby separates the issues of racism and sexism and confirms the sexism of Muslim men. However, practices that focus on racism without addressing sexism create a hierarchy of oppressions. Instead, what is required is a reframing of the issues so that racism and sexism are seen as related oppressios that contribute to the invalidation of Islam and the marginalization of Muslims, particularly Muslim women. To accomplish this reframing, re-education of journalists and educators and a concept of multiculturalism that analyzes power dynamics between self and other are needed. Footnotes (Author summary modified)
Main Term(s): Islamic law; Religion
Index Term(s): Canada; Foreign laws; Human rights; Racial discrimination; Sex discrimination; Women's rights
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=142039

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.