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NCJ Number: 142274 Find in a Library
Title: METHODS OF INTRODUCING DRUGS INTO SPAIN, CAPABILITIES OF THE CIVIL GUARD, AND FORECASTS FOR 1993
Author(s): R G Gomez
Date Published: Unknown
Page Count: 5
Type: Survey
Format: Document
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: In the past decade, there has been a dramatic increase in drug traffic into Spain; the drugs are intended both for domestic consumption and for transshipment to other European destinations.
Abstract: The amount of cocaine seized by authorities increased from 58 kilos in 1980 to 8,000 kilos in 1991. While, in many instances, the drug was hidden among goods shipped by air cargo, there has also been a significant increase in the use of ships specially contracted for the shipment of hydrochlorate of cocaine. Much of the cocaine smuggled into Spain is conducted through the large Latin American expatriate community. Cocaine is also transported by land, primarily by Turkish and Lebanese organizations that bring drugs into Western Europe by way of the Balkans, usually by heavy transport, hidden among other cargo that is exempt from customs inspections. In Spain, the Civil Guard is responsible for preventing and suppressing smuggling, protecting the points of entry, and maintaining fiscal vigilance through the customs' offices. New technologies used to detect drugs are being developed; a special working group addresses this issue within the European community.
Main Term(s): Drug smuggling; International drug law enforcement
Index Term(s): Border control; Cocaine; Drug detection; Spain
Note: Presented at the Contraband and Cargo Inspection Technology International Symposium, Washington, DC, October 1992.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=142274

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