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NCJ Number: 147732 Find in a Library
Title: DETERRENT EFFECT OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT: ANOTHER VIEW (FROM EVALUATION STUDIES REVIEW ANNUAL, VOLUME 3, P 480-493, 1978, THOMAS D. COOK, ET AL., ED.)
Author(s): P Passell; J B Taylor
Date Published: 1978
Page Count: 14
Sponsoring Agency: Sage Publications, Inc
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
Sale Source: Sage Publications, Inc
2455 Teller Road
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
United States of America
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper takes exception to Isaac Ehrlich's previous study, in which he found a negative relationship between the use of the death penalty and homicide rates in the U.S., during the period between 1935 and 1969.
Abstract: The first section describes Ehrlich's murder rate function and tests the model for parameter stability over the sample period. The second section considers Ehrlich's choice of explanatory variables and functional forms, and examines sensitivity of his estimate to these choices. Finally, the authors examine the drawbacks of inferring an execution-murder tradeoff from a single estimated equation. They conclude that the time-series model and data used in the original study permit no inference about the deterrent effect of capital punishment on homicide. The parameters of Ehrlich's model are extremely sensitive to the choices of included explanatory variables and the functional form of the model. When the model is recast in alternative, but plausible, structures, it fails to generate a deterrent effect for executions. Ehrlich replies to this critique, reports additional findings concerning the issue of deterrence based upon independent bodies of data, and relates them to results obtained through the time-series analysis.
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Capital punishment; Courts; Deterrence; Homicide trends
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=147732

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