skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 147736 Find in a Library
Title: COPING WITH THE HIGHLY DANGEROUS: ISSUES OF PRINCIPLE RAISED BY PREVENTIVE DETENTION (FROM SERIOUS VIOLENT OFFENDERS: SENTENCING, PSYCHIATRY, AND LAW REFORM, 1991, P 11- 21, SALLY-ANNE GERULL AND WILLIAM LUCAS, EDS. - SEE NCJ- 147734)
Author(s): C R Williams
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 11
Sponsoring Agency: Criminal Justice Press/Willow Tree Press
Monsey, NY 10952
Sale Source: Criminal Justice Press/Willow Tree Press
P.O. Box 249
Monsey, NY 10952
United States of America
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: Australia
Annotation: This article discusses the Community Protection Act 1990, passed by the legislature of Victoria (Australia) and its implications for the use of preventive detention for dangerous offenders.
Abstract: The legislation was passed as a Special Act of Parliament to enable the incarceration of a specific individual. This author argues that not all dangerous or deviant offenders are necessarily mentally ill and that states are able to design carefully limited and properly regulated forms of general preventive detention. This type of detention would be used in cases involving psychopaths suffering from antisocial and personality disorders, as well political terrorists or other offenders posing an immediate and unmanageable threat to the community. Such a system would come into operation during the period approaching the normal release date of the offender and would operate only in respect of those persons who had proved their danger to the community by committing the most serious offenses. Predictions of future violence would be made based on upon the offender's current conviction, criminal history, record of violent behavior while in prison, and psychiatric evaluation. Decisions as to the requisite degree of dangerousness should be made to a single judge of the Supreme Court from which there should be an appeal to the full Court. The Court would be empowered to order a further period of detention based upon perceived risk of future violent acts. 12 references
Main Term(s): Corrections
Index Term(s): Australia; Courts; Crime prevention planning; Criminology; Dangerousness; Foreign courts; Foreign criminal justice systems; Preventive detention; Psychopaths; Violent offenders
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=147736

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.