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NCJ Number: 147762 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: WHAT IMPACT WILL RANDOM YOUTH VIOLENCE HAVE ON MEDIUM LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES BY 2003
Author(s): J A Gonzales
Corporate Author: California Cmssn on Peace Officer Standards and Training
United States of America
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 130
Sponsoring Agency: California Cmssn on Peace Officer Standards and Training
Sacramento, CA 95816
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
POST Media Distribution Ctr
Sacramento, CA 95816
Publication Number: 17-0340
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

POST Media Distribution Ctr
1601 Alhambra Boulevard
Sacramento, CA 95816
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report contains projections that came out of a futures study on the impact that random youth violence will have on medium law enforcement agencies by the year 2003.
Abstract: A survey was conducted among 92 junior and senior high school students in California. Also, persons directly or indirectly responsible for handling youth--probation workers, teachers, principals, community workers--were interviewed. They indicated that early intervention is essential, and that easy access to guns and media glamorization of violence have a profound influence on random youth violence. Fundamentally, the officials proposed that prevention discussion with youths should aim to raise their self-esteem and change their nihilistic view of life, and recommended a cooperative effort among community groups, schools, and public and law enforcement agencies. They identified some important changing trends: parenting responsibility, teaching in traditional institutions, youth respect for authority, dysfunctional families, parental involvement with their children, interracial violence, sense of community, and availability of alternative youth programs. They listed the following developments as likely: armed confrontations with radical groups in rural areas, legalization of possession of automatic weapons in the home, cancellation of high school ethics class, reduction of State school budgets, media portrayal of an assassin of a racial figure as a role model, expansion of city day care hours for employees, discontinuation of high school sports, legalization of cultivation of marijuana for private use, extension of the unemployment insurance period, and granting of immigration status to 200,000 refugees. 25 references, 28 endnotes, 6 appendixes, list of official interviewed, sample questionnaire with filled-in results
Main Term(s): Police policies and procedures
Index Term(s): California; Crime prediction; Crime prevention measures; Crime prevention planning; Criminology; Future of policing; Juvenile delinquency factors; Violent crimes
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=147762

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