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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 147775 Find in a Library
Title: FUTURE OF THE CROWN PROSECUTION SERVICE IN ENGLAND AND WALES (FROM RESOURCE MATERIAL SERIES NO. 42, P 53-66, 1992, SEE -- NCJ-147772)
Author(s): R J Chronnell
Corporate Author: United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders
Japan
Date Published: 1992
Page Count: 14
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders
Tokyo, Japan
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and Treatment of Offenders
26-1 Harumi-Cho, Fuchu
Tokyo,
Japan

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Legislation/Policy Analysis
Language: English
Country: Japan
Annotation: This analysis of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) established in 1986 in England and Wales focuses on reforms that might strengthen the system and probable future changes in the CPS.
Abstract: The CPS is firmly established as an independent agency in the criminal justice system. In the future, prosecutors will probably have increased discretion, just as they now do in many other European countries. Along with this increased discretion must be an increase in the prosecutor's power to call for papers from the police. In addition, the responsibility for cautioning should be removed from the police and given to the CPS. The CPS should have the power to refer offenders and divert them from the criminal justice process, using the Probation Service as the point of referral. The prosecutors should also be subject to checks and balances that control their discretion. Additional recommendations
Main Term(s): Foreign courts
Index Term(s): England; Police prosecutor relations; Prosecution; Prosecutorial discretion; Prosecutorial diversion; Wales
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=147775

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