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NCJ Number: 147895 Find in a Library
Title: SOME ANTHROPOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS ON CAPITAL PUNISHMENT IN THE USA
Journal: International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice  Volume:17  Issue:1/2  Dated:(Spring/Fall 1993)  Pages:219-227
Author(s): J A Paredes
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 9
Type: Issue Overview
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This article reexamines the bases for widespread support for capital punishment in the United States.
Abstract: Among developed democracies, only the United States and Japan have retained the practice of the death penalty, and far fewer people are executed in Japan. Likewise, the United States stands out among other developed countries for its high murder rate and other peculiar social ills. It can be argued that the death penalty not only serves to gratify a need for retribution and for reassurance that the system of social order is maintained but also functions as imitative magic in attempting to rid American society of its social problems and cultural incongruities. Magical belief in the deterrence value of the death penalty is illustrated with native testimony. Endnotes, references
Main Term(s): Courts
Index Term(s): Criminology; Japan
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http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=147895

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