skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 147968 Find in a Library
Title: STOCKTAKING AFTER TWO SESSIONS OF THE COMMISSION ON CRIME PREVENTION AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Journal: Criminal Law Forum  Volume:4  Issue:3  Dated:(1993)  Pages:471-502
Author(s): R S Clark
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 32
Type: Survey
Format: Article
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The impact of the reorganization by the United Nations General Assembly of the Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Program is evaluated.
Abstract: The reorganization of the Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Program (Program), and in particular the creation of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice, was driven in substantial part by the hope that increased governmental involvement would bring greater focus and greater resources. In the author's evaluation, the effort toward greater focus has led largely in the direction of doing less, and in particular doing less in respect of the existing multitude of United Nations (UN) norms and standards in the criminal justice area. It, however, has led to a greater emphasis on technical cooperation and to a search for the optimal role that the organization might play in such endeavors. As for resources, the vastly enhanced peacemaking and peacekeeping role that the UN has undertaken of late faces the hurdle that many states are balking when it comes to paying. Considering the matter of politicization, the Committee on Crime Prevention and Control and, to a lesser extent, the Congresses on the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders, have been able to emphasize technical and professional concerns, thereby succeeding in being somewhat less politicized than, for example, the Commission on Human Rights.
Main Term(s): Crime prevention measures
Index Term(s): Criminal justice program evaluation; United Nations standards
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=147968

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.