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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 147971 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: EDUCATIONAL HISTORIES OF INCARCERATED MALE FELONS WITH AN EMPHASIS ON PERCEPTIONS OF SCHOOL, CAUSES OF DROPPING OUT, AND PARTICIPATION IN PRISON EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS
Author(s): R T Stephens
Corporate Author: US Dept of Education
Office of Educational Research and Improvement
United States of America
Date Published: 1990
Page Count: 187
Sponsoring Agency: US Dept of Education
Washington, DC 20208
Sale Source: US Dept of Education
Office of Educational Research and Improvement
555 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20208
United States of America
Type: Thesis/Dissertation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Results of a study of inmates at New York State's Sing Sing Correctional Facility are discussed.
Abstract: A study of a random sample of 220 male inmates was conducted in the summer of 1989. Questionnaires were distributed directly to the inmates. Results indicate that 79 percent of the respondents were high school dropouts, including 78 percent of the black respondents, 69 percent of the white respondents, and 87 percent of the Hispanic respondents. Dropouts experienced a significantly greater rate of grade retention, school transfers, misbehavior, poor attendance, and poor academic performance than did graduates in prison. They also had significantly less extracurricular activity. Major reasons for dropping out were wanting to work and being bored with courses. In their last two years of school, only half had had contact with a counselor. Adverse socioeconomic conditions and poor role modeling probably contributed to dropping out and criminality. At the time of arrest, only 52 percent of the dropouts were employed, compared to 71 percent of the graduates. Both graduates and dropouts exhibited prevalent drug use, gang affiliation, and relatively low income. Most dropouts regretted their decision to drop out. Eighty-five percent of the sample had participated in the prison's educational programs. Of the 173 dropouts, 103 had acquired a General Educational Development (GED) diploma, with 89 acquiring the GED in prison. Sixteen previous dropouts and 11 graduates attained college degrees while incarcerated. English and Spanish questionnaires and a 10-page bibliography are included.
Main Term(s): Corrections
Index Term(s): Inmate academic education; Inmate attitudes
Note: Doctoral dissertation, New York University
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=147971

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