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NCJ Number: 148264 Find in a Library
Title: DECLINING ROLE OF REHABILITATION IN CANADIAN JUVENILE JUSTICE: IMPLICATIONS OF UNDERLYING THEORY IN THE YOUNG OFFENDERS ACT (FROM YOUTH INJUSTICE: CANADIAN PERSPECTIVES, P 39-47, 1993, THOMAS O'REILLY-FLEMING, BARRY CLARK, EDS. -- SEE NCJ-148261)
Author(s): A W Leschied; P Gendreau
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 9
Sponsoring Agency: Canadian Scholars Press
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2V6, Canada
Sale Source: Canadian Scholars Press
Marketing Manager
180 Bloor St. West
Suite 1202
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2V6,
Canada
Type: Issue Overview
Language: English
Country: Canada
Annotation: The authors draw upon recent evidence generated from one Canadian jurisdiction to clearly implicate the Young Offenders Act as a harbinger of benign neglect in the area of juvenile justice.
Abstract: The preoccupation with the politics of implementation has prevented critical analysis of the underlying theoretical assumptions of the Young Offenders Act (YOA). The philosophy underlying the YOA is strongly based on punishment not rehabilitation. In many respects, the state has legitimized the neglect of young persons who were previously cared for. Although its proponents claim it is progressive legislation unique to Canadian criminal justice, the YOA actually represents social policy borrowed from the United States. The author looks briefly at juvenile justice in the United States and Canada and at empirical data on the effects of the YOA. The legislation in its present form has created difficulties for proponents of rehabilitation. Future amendments to the YOA should recognize the need for a more balanced integration of civil rights and rehabilitation. Endnotes
Main Term(s): Juveniles
Index Term(s): Foreign juvenile justice systems
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=148264

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