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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 148281 Find in a Library
Title: GETTING CONNECTED: BECOMING A STREET HUSTLER (FROM YOUTH INJUSTICE: CANADIAN PERSPECTIVES, P 377-428, 1993, THOMAS O'REILLY-FLEMING, BARRY CLARK, EDS. -- SEE NCJ- 148261)
Author(s): L A Visano
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 52
Sponsoring Agency: Canadian Scholars Press
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2V6, Canada
Sale Source: Canadian Scholars Press
Marketing Manager
180 Bloor St. West
Suite 1202
Toronto, Ontario M5S 2V6,
Canada
Type: Issue Overview
Language: English
Country: Canada
Annotation: This article clarifies the process by which individuals enter an occupation, specifically, how boys get connected to prostitution.
Abstract: The author examines the circumstances under which boys who become involved with prostitution set themselves apart from conventional society and perceive themselves as part of the street culture. He follows an approach to becoming a hustler that focuses on two general contexts: pre-occupational experiences of dislocation and exposure, and the development of street relations. Getting connected to hustling requires a collective effort wherein the interests and involvements of significant others are central. Tables, references
Main Term(s): Juveniles
Index Term(s): Criminology; Foreign juvenile justice systems; Juvenile prostitution
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=148281

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