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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 148382 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: OVERSIGHT HEARING ON ORGANIZED CRIME STRIKE FORCES: HEARING BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE SUBCOMMITTEE ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY, JUNE 20, 1989
Corporate Author: US Congress
House Subcommittee on Criminal Justice
United States of America
Date Published: 1989
Page Count: 272
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Superintendent of Documents, GPO
Washington, DC 20402
US Congress
Washington, DC 20515
Sale Source: Superintendent of Documents, GPO
Washington, DC 20402
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Legislative Hearing/Committee Report
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Testimony before the House Subcommittee on Criminal Justice considers the announced intention of Attorney General Thornburgh to merge organized crime strike forces with U.S. attorneys' offices.
Abstract: Edward Dennis, acting Deputy Attorney General, explains the benefits of this proposed organizational change. One benefit would be a comprehensive use of the Justice Department's resources against organized crime. Another benefit would be that the personal relationships and local clout of the U.S. Attorney would forge alliances with local district attorneys, State attorneys general, and State and local law enforcement agencies to combat organized crime. There would also be a cost savings, which would result from economies of scale and the elimination of duplicative efforts. A former strike force attorney opposes the consolidation, as he argues it will precipitate an exodus of talented, experienced, and knowledgeable prosecutors from the Federal system. A former U.S. attorney also argues against the proposed consolidation. He says that the proposed consolidation is not designed to make organized crime investigations and prosecutions more effective, but rather to give U.S. attorneys offices the glory in the fight against organized crime. He reasons that the current system works, and any change may seriously impede a successful program.
Main Term(s): Police management
Index Term(s): Gangs; Organized crime; Organized crime investigation; US Department of Justice
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=148382

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