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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 148807 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Federal Court Governance: Why Congress Should -- and Why Congress Should Not -- Create a Full-Time Executive Judge, Abolish the Judicial Conference, and Remove Circuit Judges from District Court Governance
Corporate Author: Federal Judicial Ctr
United States of America
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 137
Sponsoring Agency: Federal Judicial Ctr
Washington, DC 20002
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: Federal Judicial Ctr
Thurgood Marshall Federal Judiciary Building
One Columbus Circle, NE
Washington, DC 20002
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper analyzes current Federal court governance arrangements and suggests alternatives to those arrangements.
Abstract: The author articulates the implicit assumptions upon which the current arrangement appears to rest, then offers arguments supporting and opposing a detailed set of alternatives, as a way of assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the current system. The final section of the book reassesses the initial assumptions in light of the proposed alternative arrangements. These include creating a full-time executive judge for the Federal courts, leading to a less active role for the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court; establishing a policymaking agency different from the Judicial Conference; merging the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts and the Federal Judicial Center; relieving appellate judges of district court governance responsibilities; and implementing a new way of selecting chief judges. 151 notes and 3 appendixes
Main Term(s): Courts
Index Term(s): Court reform; Federal courts
Note: Long-Range Planning Series, Paper No. 3.
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=148807

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