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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 148955 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Study of Domestic Violence Policies in Virginia's Law Enforcement Agencies
Corporate Author: Virginia Dept of Criminal Justice Services
Criminal Justice Research Ctr
United States of America
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 88
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Office for Victims of Crime
Washington, DC 20531
Virginia Dept of Criminal Justice Services
Richmond, VA 23219
Grant Number: 90-FV-CX-0005
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Virginia Dept of Criminal Justice Services
Criminal Justice Research Ctr
1100 Bank St.
Richmond, VA 23219
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Legislation/Policy Analysis
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report presents the results of a study of the use of arrest in domestic violence in Virginia, so as to use the information gathered to update the domestic violence curriculum for local law enforcement in Virginia and revise Police/Sheriff's Department General Order 2-32 (model domestic violence policy for Virginia law enforcement agencies). Several methods were used to determine the scope and the effectiveness of arrest practices in Virginia. Project staff surveyed local law enforcement agencies to discover the number and characteristics of departments that took advantage of warrantless arrest legislation passed in 1984. They also conducted an indepth analysis of the Alexandria Domestic Violence Intervention Project, a program that implemented an arrest policy 3 years prior to the evaluation. This analysis included interviews with members of the multidisciplinary team, a survey of Alexandria police officers, and an examination of batterer recidivism rates. Results of the study of batterer recidivism rates generally supported the use of arrest and treatment, with a consistent decline in recidivism from 1988 through 1991; however, rate changes were not statistically significant, and caution should be used in drawing conclusions. A substantial amount of relevant information was gleaned from this project and used to revise the domestic violence curriculum for law enforcement officers. A series of training sessions was conducted in the summer of 1992 and resulted in the further demand for these classes in 1993. This information was also used to update the model domestic violence intervention policy that will be distributed to all law enforcement agencies in Virginia. Implications for community intervention programs as well as development of arrest policies are discussed in the section on recommendations. A 23-item bibliography and appended tables and figures
Main Term(s): Victims of Crime
Index Term(s): Arrest and apprehension; Domestic assault; Police; Police policies and procedures; Statistics; Virginia
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=148955

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