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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 149065 Find in a Library
Title: Fighting Back in our Neighborhoods
Corporate Author: Schaumburg Police Dept
United States of America
Date Published: Unknown
Page Count: 22
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Schaumburg Police Dept
Schaumburg, IL 60194
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Schaumburg Police Dept
1000 West Schaumburg Road
Schaumburg, IL 60194
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Citizen Involvement Material
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This booklet presents suggestions for parents and community residents of Schaumburg, Ill., on how to deal effectively with gangs and their efforts to influence children, and notes the negative consequences if the potential impacts of gangs are ignored.
Abstract: Schaumburg has very few identified street gang members as residents and only a few sporadic, semi-organized gorups identifying themselves as street gangs. These groups have been identified through their use of graffiti to mark their territory and through arrest and interviews of a variety of gang members for various crimes. Interviews with these gang members reveal that they maintain ties to major Chicago street gangs either through direct membership or as a franchise operating in the suburbs. Gang activity may include drug trafficking, burglary, theft, property damage, intimidation, and homicide. Gang members feel great pride in their gangs and their turf. Most law enforcement agencies view gang activity that should be addressed in its early stages to prevent later serious problems and violence. Chicago has 40 documented street gangs with approximately 28,000 members. Gang members use hand signals, graffiti, and tattoos to signify their membershp and show their gang affiliation to others. To prevent their children from joining a gang, parents should display an active interest in their children's activities and friends, make contact with the parents of their children's friends, confront their teenager if they suspect gang involvement, seek help if needed, and encourage school policies that address gang- related activity. Education, community involvement, and parental involvement are the main ways to address gang violence. Illustrations and descriptions of signs of gang activity
Main Term(s): Juvenile/Youth Gangs
Index Term(s): Community involvement; Gang Prevention; Illinois; Juvenile gang behavior patterns; Parental influence
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149065

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