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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 149225 Find in a Library
Title: P.O.S.T. Gang Awareness Course: Hispanic Gang Presentation
Author(s): J Guzman
Date Published: Unknown
Page Count: 32
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
POST Media Distribution Ctr
Sacramento, CA 95816
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

POST Media Distribution Ctr
1601 Alhambra Boulevard
Sacramento, CA 95816
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Training (Aid/Material)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This presentation introduces criminal justice professionals to the physical appearance and behavior of Hispanic gangs.
Abstract: The introductory section focuses on the history of Hispanic gangs from the early 1900's to the present. It also describes the physical appearance of Hispanic gang members including their knit caps, Pendleton shirts, other characteristic clothing, tattoos, and preferred vehicles. A detailed section is devoted to the "placa," (i.e., the Hispanic use of graffiti) which consists of symbolic representations of the gang and its individual members and is used to mark territory. The concluding section explains the concepts of residence and territoriality with Chicano gangs of Los Angeles. While gang experts traditionally assumed that members live in the territory they defend as their turf, this may no longer be true. Today it is possible for nonresident Chicanos to become gang members of a particular territory. Evidence suggests that nonresident gang members may be even more violent in defending territory than the resident ones. In addition, gangs are such long standing and established phenomena in the Chicano neighborhoods of Los Angeles that a gang member's move to another neighborhood only involves either staying with the old gang or joining a new, resident gang. However, there is no getting away from the gangs. 25 references
Main Term(s): Gangs
Index Term(s): Graffiti; Hispanic Americans; Juvenile gang behavior patterns; Territorial behavior
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149225

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