skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 149226 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Differential Use of Courts by Minority and Non-Minority Populations in New Jersey
Author(s): S S Silbey; P Ewick
Corporate Author: New Jersey Supreme Court
United States of America
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 112
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
New Jersey Supreme Court
Trenton, NJ 08625
State Justice Institute
Alexandria, VA 22314
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

State Justice Institute
1650 King Street
Suite 600
Alexandria, VA 22314
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This survey describes the judicial practices of New Jersey's minority and nonminority population and examines problems which might account for racial/ethnic differences in court use.
Abstract: The results are based on 403 questionnaires completed by a demographically representative sample of New Jersey's population. The average number of problems with courts reported was 14; that number did not vary significantly by race or ethnicity. However, particular minorities reported experiencing certain problem situations more frequently than other groups. In general, respondents found the legal system effective, although their opinion of the courts' accessibility and fairness was lower. Especially African-Americans rated the legal system more negatively with regards to effectiveness and fairness. Yet blacks and Hispanics reported that they preferred formal institutions to informal means of handling their problems. In fact, nonwhites consistently described themselves as more willing to involve the courts than whites. Throughout the analysis, there was as much variation among different minority groups as there was between whites and nonwhites. This variation suggests that social analyses tend to overemphasize the differences between whites and nonwhites while neglecting the considerable differences between the different minorities. 47 references
Main Term(s): State courts
Index Term(s): Court studies; Criminal justice system effectiveness; Discrimination; Minorities; New Jersey
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149226

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.