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NCJ Number: 149230 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Street Gang Update
Corporate Author: New Mexico Dept of Public Safety
United States of America
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 72
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
New Mexico Dept of Public Safety
Sante Fe, NM 87504
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

New Mexico Dept of Public Safety
P.O. Box 1628
Sante Fe, NM 87504
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This collection of articles highlights New Mexico's escalating gang problems.
Abstract: The first article presents a survey of statewide police and sheriff's departments concerning their experiences with gang members and criminality. A second article reviews the gang experience of three major police departments (Dallas, Denver, and Phoenix) in neighboring States. The following article focuses on street gangs, which by now are no longer confined to New Mexico's big cities. Two articles describe gang violence in Albuquerque and Duke City respectively, while the following article explains the interrelation between prison gangs and street gangs. Two articles introduce groups trying to resolve gang problems: the What's Up Group, which helps gang members get along at Springer Boys' School, and the New Mexico Street Gang Task Force established by the Governor's Organized Crime Prevention Commission. Next, youth programs and models for community action against gang activities are described. Last, a district attorney suggests legal changes designed to alleviate gang problems and praises the rewriting of New Mexico's Children's Code in 1993 as a good beginning.
Main Term(s): Gangs
Index Term(s): Arizona; Colorado; Dispute resolution; Gang Prevention; Model programs; New Mexico; Texas
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149230

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