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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 149246 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Blueprint on Gangs: A Coordinated Approach to a Growing Problem
Author(s): C Levine
Corporate Author: Oregon Crime Prevention Resource Ctr
Criminal Justice Services Division
United States of America
Editor(s): S Loftus
Date Published: 1992
Page Count: 51
Sponsoring Agency: Bureau of Justice Assistance
Washington, DC 20531
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Oregon Crime Prevention Resource Ctr
Salem, OR 97310
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Oregon Crime Prevention Resource Ctr
Criminal Justice Services Division
155 Cottage NE
Salem, OR 97310
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Report (Technical Assistance)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This manual examines the factors that promote gang development, the signs of gang activity, and the history of gang development in the Portland, Oregon, area, and suggest strategies and tactics for use by individuals and organizations in a community to organize antigang activities in a community and deal with youth who are involved in gangs.
Abstract: The discussion emphasizes that gangs can develop in any type of community, not just in a big city. The problem is growing and spreading around Oregon. Gang members range from 8 to 23 years of age, are all races and genders, and perceive that they have limited employment and social opportunities. In most gangs, leadership is loose except in times of crisis. Recruitment tactics include intimidation, monetary inducements, family involvement, and peer pressure. Community providers that can form antigang partnerships include schools, religious institutions, social service organizations, youth recreation agencies, law enforcement agencies, the juvenile justice system, other government agencies, health care providers, the media, businesses, and community groups. Appended gang profiles, lists of community resources, checklist for community organizing, and related materials
Main Term(s): Juvenile/Youth Gangs
Index Term(s): Criminology; Gang Prevention; Oregon
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149246

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