skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 149352 Find in a Library
Title: Dominican Narco-Traffickers
Author(s): F Garrido
Date Published: 1992
Page Count: 15
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
New York Police Dept
New York, NY 10011
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

New York Police Dept
Drug Enforcement Task Force
99 Tenth Avenue
New York, NY 10011
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Training (Aid/Material)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This paper profiles the structure and operations of Dominican drug traffickers in New York City.
Abstract: New York City has the highest concentration of Dominicans, legal and illegal, in the United States, approximately one million. They are concentrated in the Washington Heights area of Manhattan. The increase in Dominican participation in all levels of narco-trafficking and types of substances (heroin/cocaine) constitutes the emergence of a new criminal group of major significance. The Dominican narco-trafficker is perhaps the most cunning and resourceful. Total control of a community is achieved through coercion and intimidation. They are well-armed and readily kill those who would obstruct their drug enterprises. Law enforcement efforts are stymied by the silence of intimidated witnesses, the ability of Dominican traffickers to integrate and interrelate with various ethnic groups, and the use of legitimate businesses to hide illegal activities. Since the Dominican Republic does not recognize extradition of its citizens, Dominican traffickers being sought by American police find sanctuary in their home country and then return to the United States at a later time. Law enforcement efforts against Dominican traffickers can be improved through greater law-enforcement cooperation at the city, State, and Federal levels. A Dominican liaison with the Immigration and Naturalization Service could help in securing information on the identification and travel patterns of Dominicans suspected of narco-trafficking. Liaisons with the Custom Service and the Internal Revenue Service would also be fruitful.
Main Term(s): Criminology
Index Term(s): Dominican Republic; Drug smuggling; Hispanic Americans; Illegal Immigrants/Aliens; Organized crime
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149352

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.