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NCJ Number: 149370 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Detention Study Committee Report
Corporate Author: Utah Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice
United States of America
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 79
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Utah Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Utah Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice
350 East 500 South, Suite 200
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Legislation/Policy Analysis
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report of the Utah Detention Study Committee assesses current juvenile detention practices and recommends ways to improve them.
Abstract: The committee found that the number of youth at risk for delinquency in Utah is at an all-time high. Currently, there are approximately 290,000 youth in Utah from the ages of 10 through 17. Overcrowding is a problem in a number of Utah's detention centers. The Salt Lake Detention Center and Moweda Youth Home account for 58 percent of all detention admissions statewide. Overcrowding occurred in the Salt Lake Detention Center 98 percent of all nights and the Moweda Youth Home 51 percent of all nights during fiscal year 1993. Ethnic minorities are overrepresented in juvenile detention admissions. Hispanics account for 4.3 percent of Utah's school age population and 16.3 percent of all admissions to detention in fiscal year 1993. Youth of color account for 8.2 percent of all youth in Utah and 27.5 percent of statewide detention admissions. Youth of color stay in detention longer than white juveniles. Ethnic minority staff are underrepresented in juvenile detention centers and do not reflect the ethnic characteristics of the population they serve. Committee recommendations are in 14 areas. They include alternatives to detention; constructions of additional secure beds; the development of juvenile receiving centers; statutory provisions; and ethnic minority youth detention staff, probation officers, and juvenile court judges. Other recommendations pertain to rural issues; statewide detention admission guidelines; youth corrections mission statement, policies, and procedures; and community/neighborhood based prevention programs. A minority report is included.
Main Term(s): Juvenile detention
Index Term(s): Corrections policies; Inmate statistics; Juvenile detention decisionmaking; Utah
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149370

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