skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 149427 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Need To Know: Juvenile Record Sharing
Author(s): J A Rapp; R D Stephens; D Clontz
Corporate Author: National School Safety Ctr
Pepperdine University
United States of America
Date Published: 1989
Page Count: 88
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
National School Safety Ctr
Westlake Village, CA 91362
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Washington, DC 20531
Grant Number: 85-MU-CX-0003
Publication Number: ISBN 0-932612-22-9
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

National School Safety Ctr
Pepperdine University
4165 Thousand Oaks Boulevard
Suite 290
Westlake Village, CA 91362
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Legislation/Policy Analysis
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report examines current State policies regarding juvenile records access and proposes means whereby youth- serving agencies may have access to these records based on their need-to-know information that will help them better serve youth and protect society.
Abstract: The first part of the report discusses juvenile record sharing and confidentiality. It supports the need for information management that closely monitors juvenile records confidentiality and disclosure. Confidentiality protects a youth's right to privacy, avoids stigmatization, and allows the processes of education and rehabilitation to occur. Disclosure, however, is warranted to ensure that needed services and supervision will be provided and that school and community safety will be served. The authors conclude that information management by interagency child- serving professionals requires policies that ensure compliance with applicable statutes. They also must recognize the need for cooperation by seeking or granting access to information when warranted. Information management must strike a proper balance between confidentiality and disclosure to avoid information "territorialism." The report suggests eight steps for an interagency group to follow in the development of information-management policies. The report also provides a State-by-State analysis of juvenile records statutes. Appended use-of-State-statute tables, a model juvenile records code, model legislation, and sample forms for records disclosure.
Main Term(s): Juvenile records confidentiality
Index Term(s): Confidential records access; Court records
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149427

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.