skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 149448 Find in a Library
Title: Legalization of Drugs: The Wrong Answer to a Complex Problem
Corporate Author: United States Attorney's Office
Northern District of Ohio
United States of America
Date Published: 1991
Page Count: 35
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States Attorney's Office
Cleveland, OH 44114
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

United States Attorney's Office
Northern District of Ohio
1800 Bank One Ctr
600 Superior Avenue East
Cleveland, OH 44114
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Legislation/Policy Analysis
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This analysis of the arguments for and against drug legalization concludes that the arguments for legalization have many deficiencies and that many practical reasons exist for rejecting the legalization of drugs.
Abstract: Common arguments for drug legalization are that alcohol prohibition was ineffective, that supply reduction policies have increased rather than reduced supplies, that the demand for drugs is part of the United States culture, and that society could learn to live with the legalization of drugs just as it has learned to live with tobacco and alcohol. Further arguments focus on the experience of other countries, individual rights, the choice of lifestyle, drug regulation, drug-related violence, the profits made by drug dealers, potential tax revenues related to drug sales, and the impacts on law enforcement resources. The text counters each of these arguments and concludes that insufficient information is available to justify a change in policy and practice regarding drug abuse. Figures, tables, and 6 references
Main Term(s): Drug legalization
Index Term(s): Drug laws; Drug Policy; Drug regulation
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149448

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.