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NCJ Number: 149661 Find in a Library
Title: Petitioners' Characteristics (From Habeas Corpus in State and Federal Courts, P 35-38, 1994, Victor E. Flango - See NCJ- 149658)
Author(s): V E Flango
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 4
Sponsoring Agency: National Ctr for State Courts
Williamsburg, VA 23185-4147
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
State Justice Institute
Alexandria, VA 22314
Sale Source: National Ctr for State Courts
300 Newport Avenue
Williamsburg, VA 23185-4147
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

State Justice Institute
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Suite 600
Alexandria, VA 22314
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This chapter discusses the characteristics of inmates who file a habeas corpus petition.
Abstract: Because the process itself takes a long time, habeas petitioners tend to be convicted of serious crimes and to be serving long prison terms, with median times ranging from a minimum sentence of 24 years to a maximum of 30 years in State courts, and 16 to 24 years for petitioners in Federal courts. Most habeas petitioners were convicted by juries, as guilty pleas may reduce the number of issues over which a habeas petition may be filed. The majority of petitioners had court- appointed counsel, while smaller percentages were represented by public defenders and contract attorneys. While the overwhelming majority of petitioners were represented by counsel for their initial offense, most were not represented in filing the habeas corpus petitions. 1 table and 7 notes
Main Term(s): Courts
Index Term(s): Corrections; Federal courts; Habeas corpus; Offender profiles; State courts
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149661

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