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NCJ Number: 149708 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Summary Report of an Evaluation of the Violence Intervention Program
Author(s): W G Woodall
Date Published: 1993
Page Count: 51
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
New Mexico Ctr for Dispute Resolution
Albuquerque, NM 87102
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

New Mexico Ctr for Dispute Resolution
510 Second Street NW
Suite 209
Albuquerque, NM 87102
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: The Violence Intervention Program (VIP) employs various teaching, interpersonal skill development, conflict reduction, and anger management techniques for youths and parents who have entered the juvenile justice system because of violent crime.
Abstract: The program attempts to address the needs and problems of these youths before they proceed further in the criminal justice system. The VIP was evaluated using 15 adolescent participants; four did not complete the program, leaving 11 participants for evaluation. Most participants were male Hispanics between 14 and 17 years of age. Outcome, process, and formative evaluation data were obtained using questionnaires and interviews. Results showed that the VIP impacted participants in terms of their likelihood of getting into family arguments, self-efficacy for controlling violent behavior in family conflicts, self-efficacy for empathy and understanding other peers who behaved violently, intention to employ conflict reduction techniques with peers, and knowledge of conflict and conflict reduction. After participating in the VIP, parents felt they understood their adolescents better, valued the communication skills training, perceived the problem-solving training as effective, and found it comforting to relate to other parents and families with the same difficulties. Findings revealed, however, that the VIP had more impact on adolescents than adults. Program improvement recommendations are offered, and adolescent and parent questionnaires are included. 2 tables
Main Term(s): Juveniles
Index Term(s): Conflict resolution; Hispanic Americans; Interpersonal relations; Minority juvenile offenders; Parent-Child Relations; Peer influences on behavior; Violence prevention; Violent juvenile offenders
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149708

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