skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 149975 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: Down for the Set: Describing and Defining Gangs in San Diego
Author(s): S Pennell; E Evans; R Melton; S Hinson
Corporate Author: San Diego Assoc of Governments
Criminal Justice Research Unit
United States of America
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 235
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
San Diego Assoc of Governments
San Diego, CA 92101
US Dept of Health and Human Services
Washington, DC 20447
Grant Number: 90-CL-1080/01
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

San Diego Assoc of Governments
Criminal Justice Research Unit
Security Pacific Plaza
1200 Third Avenue
San Diego, CA 92101
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Report (Study/Research)
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This study examined the nature and scope of gangs, including facets of recruitment; initiation; leadership; members' reasons for joining; and perceptions about family, neighborhood, school, and the police.
Abstract: In addition, the study explored programs and strategies to prevent and reduce gang violence. Research tasks included a review of current and past literature about gangs, ride- alongs with police and probation departments' gang units, interviews with local experts, surveys of practitioners in many disciplines, and interviews with known gang members on intensive probation supervision. Study findings show that San Diego gang members are similar in many ways to their counterparts in other areas of the country with respect to individual perceptions as well as features of gang involvement. Gang membership generally evolves from friendship groups formed in early childhood. Gang involvement solidifies peer relationships and brings feelings of status, pride, recognition, excitement, and power to members. Most gangs are loosely organized with unstructured activities and changing leadership. The most frequent activity of gang members is hanging out with "homies" (friends from the neighborhood, homeboys). Gang members show strong attachments to their families and neighborhoods. Violence is a feature of gangs and is used primarily to protect turf or territory or in retaliation for perceived wrongdoing. Attitudes of gang members suggest that violence is an acceptable means for addressing conflict. Most gang members use illicit drugs and many also sell them, but sales are not a highly organized gang activity. Programs to reduce gang violence must involve a wide array of agencies, including schools, community-based agencies, churches, and the justice system. Programs must be targeted appropriately for prevention, intervention, suppression, and rehabilitation purposes. 47 tables, 1 figure, 70 references, and appended supplementary material
Main Term(s): Juvenile/Youth Gangs
Index Term(s): California; Crime prevention measures; Drug smuggling; Juvenile gang behavior patterns; Police policies and procedures; Statistics
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=149975

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.