skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 150086 Find in a Library
Title: Foster Care: Parental Drug Abuse Has Alarming Impact on Young Children
Corporate Author: US Government Accountability Office
United States of America
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 29
Sponsoring Agency: Azimuth Inc.
Fairmont, WV 26554
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Government Accountability Office
Washington, DC 20548
Publication Number: GAO/HEHS-94-89
Sale Source: Azimuth Inc.
1000 Technology Drive, Suite 3120
Fairmont, WV 26554
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report by the U.S. General Accounting Office compared and contrasted the population sizes and distinctive characteristics of young foster children in 1986 and 1991, using data from New York, Pennsylvania, and California, the States with the largest average foster care populations in 1991.
Abstract: The results showed that, in 1991 compared to 1986, the foster care population was much larger, and more children were likely to have entered foster care due to some type of neglect, to have biological parents who abused drugs, to have more health-related problems themselves including those stemming from prenatal exposure to drugs, and to be eligible for Federal maintenance payments. Both Federal and State expenditures have felt the impact of the growth in the number of young foster children and the decline in their overall level of health. Drug abuse treatment programs for biological mothers and pregnant women need to emphasize the risks of prenatal exposure to drugs and the likelihood that children will be removed from their families. Services to address the health and developmental needs of drug-exposed children are needed and should overlap with existing health and foster care programs. 6 figures, 9 notes, and 3 appendixes
Main Term(s): Juveniles
Index Term(s): Abused children; Children of drug abusers; Foster homes; Pregnant drug abusers; Prenatal biological influences
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=150086

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.