skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 150513 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: LEAD: A Boot Camp and Intensive Parole Program: An Implementation and Process Evaluation of the First Year
Author(s): J Bottcher; T Isorena
Corporate Author: California Dept of the Youth Authority
United States of America
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 120
Sponsoring Agency: California Dept of the Youth Authority
Sacramento, CA 95823
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: California Dept of the Youth Authority
4241 Williamsborough Drive
Sacramento, CA 95823
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This report describes and assesses the California Youth Authority's shock incarceration program (boot camp) for juvenile offenders during its first year of operation.
Abstract: The program's major goals are to reduce recidivism and provide a cost-effective treatment option. LEAD was designed in two phases: a 4-month, highly structured boot camp phase and a 6-month intensive parole phase followed by standard parole for any remaining commitment time. The treatment modality encompasses a diversified array of training, counseling, and physically challenging activities; military procedures established in collaboration with the California National Guard; and intensive parole supervision activities, including relapse-management strategies. The LEAD program opened in September 1992. The screening process generated 365 eligible wards through the end of August 1993, 180 of whom were admitted. New groups of 15 wards entered every 28 days throughout the first year. Seventy-one percent of the first 150 wards were graduated and referred to parole after an average of 4 months. The others were usually dropped due to gang-related behavior, assaultive behavior, or lack of motivation. The overall budget was $1,086,300. The analysis revealed that the program has been implemented as specified by the legislation. Further data will be gathered to determine its impacts. It has many promising characteristics as well as areas in which improvement is needed. Recommendations, tables, figures, appended tables and background materials, and 27 references
Main Term(s): Juvenile correctional programs
Index Term(s): California; Shock incarceration programs
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=150513

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.