skip navigation

PUBLICATIONS

Register for Latest Research

Stay Informed
Register with NCJRS to receive NCJRS's biweekly e-newsletter JUSTINFO and additional periodic emails from NCJRS and the NCJRS federal sponsors that highlight the latest research published or sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs.

NCJRS Abstract

The document referenced below is part of the NCJRS Virtual Library collection. To conduct further searches of the collection, visit the Virtual Library. See the Obtain Documents page for direction on how to access resources online, via mail, through interlibrary loans, or in a local library.

 

NCJ Number: 151507 Find in a Library
Title: Heroin: Availability and Trafficking in Maryland
Corporate Author: Maryland State Police
Criminal Intelligence Division
United States of America
Date Published: 1992
Page Count: 29
Sponsoring Agency: Maryland State Police
Columbia, MD 21045
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Publication Number: X-97-00050
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

Maryland State Police
Criminal Intelligence Division
7175 Gateway Drive
Columbia, MD 21045
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Statistics
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This review of heroin demand and use indicators for Maryland indicates that inhalation has doubled since 1988 as a usage method by heroin addicts seeking treatment and that most inhalers are under 30 years of age.
Abstract: Trends indicate that inhalers are more likely to switch to intravenous use than intravenous users are to switch to inhaling. Although less significant than the increase in inhalation, other methods of heroin use have doubled since 1988. Drug Use Forecasting statistics for arrestees in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area testing positive for opiates indicate declining heroin use. For Baltimore City in particular, adult arrests for heroin increased every year between 1985 and 1989 and then dropped slightly in 1990 and 1991. Juvenile arrest referrals for all drugs were up slightly in 1991 after large increases for the previous 3 years. The National High School Senior Survey for heroin prevalence indicated that 1989 was a peak year, followed by a general downward trend. Data on heroin availability and trafficking show that most opium comes from Southeast and Southwest Asia, that South American cartels are attempting to grow opium poppies and manufacture heroin, that heroin's street-level purity in Baltimore is rising dramatically, that the District of Columbia is experiencing a rise in heroin purity levels and a decline in heroin prices, and that highway heroin interdictions by the Maryland State Police have risen every year since 1988. Heroin trend indicators from New York are also noted, as well as difficulties associated with forecasting heroin demand and trafficking trends in Maryland. 4 footnotes, 18 tables, and 3 figures
Main Term(s): Drug abuse
Index Term(s): Asia; District of Columbia; Drug law enforcement; Drug manufacturing; Drug offenders; Heroin; Juvenile drug abusers; Maryland; New York; Opioids; Police; South America; State crime statistics
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=151507

*A link to the full-text document is provided whenever possible. For documents not available online, a link to the publisher's website is provided. Tell us how you use the NCJRS Library and Abstracts Database - send us your feedback.