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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 151514 Find in a Library
Title: Performance Audit of the Probation Supervision Program Administered by the Department of Corrections
Author(s): S L Lipner
Date Published: 1991
Page Count: 50
Sponsoring Agency: Florida Office of the Auditor General
Tallahassee, FL 32302
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Publication Number: 11779
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

Florida Office of the Auditor General
P.O. Box 1735
Tallahassee, FL 32302
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This audit of probation case files maintained by Florida's Department of Corrections (DOC) indicated a lack of adequate documentation to assure that probationers who completed probation complied with all court-ordered probation conditions.
Abstract: Of 487 probation cases reviewed, 289 offenders (59 percent) completed their probation terms. In 75 percent of the 289 cases, files did not contain documentation that the offender completed all monetary obligations and special probation conditions. The audit also found that correctional probation officers did not routinely complete special progress reports on probationers whose probation terms were revoked. As a result, the status of monetary obligations at the time of parole revocation was not clearly documented. Files of probationers who completed probation did not always contain documentation on offender compliance with probation conditions. For cases where probation was revoked, correctional probation officers did not follow DOC procedures for documenting the status of compliance with monetary conditions at the time of probation revocation. Although case files did not contain complete information on employment status and income, preliminary data suggested that probationers who were unemployed at the beginning of the probation term were less likely to complete probation than those who were employed. Three factors may have contributed to the DOC's failure to document offender compliance with probation conditions: (1) correctional probation officers are required to conduct various administrative tasks in order to monitor and document the status of probationer payments; (2) correctional probation officers must balance their efforts to document and report the failure to pay monetary obligations with efforts to change offender behavior; and (3) correctional probation supervisors do not always conduct supervisory case reviews, as required by DOC procedures. Recommendations to improve data collection on probationers are offered. Appendixes contain further information on the file review methodology and DOC's response to the audit. 4 footnotes, 2 tables, and 9 exhibits
Main Term(s): Corrections effectiveness
Index Term(s): Community-based corrections (adult); Florida; Probation effectiveness; Probation evaluation; Probation or parole officers; Probation or parole records; Probation statistics; Probation violations; Probationers
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=151514

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