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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 151620 Find in a Library
Title: Drug Control: Interdiction Efforts in Central America Have Had Little Impact on the Flow of Drugs
Corporate Author: US Government Accountability Office
National Security and International Affairs Division
United States of America
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 36
Sponsoring Agency: Azimuth Inc.
Fairmont, WV 26554
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
US Government Accountability Office
Washington, DC 20548
Publication Number: GAO/NSIAD-94-233
Sale Source: Azimuth Inc.
1000 Technology Drive, Suite 3120
Fairmont, WV 26554
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
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United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Program/Project Evaluation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This review of narcotics control efforts being conducted in Central America and assisted by the United States concludes that these interdiction efforts have had little impact on the flow of drugs into the United States.
Abstract: Despite various United States Government interdiction efforts, Central America continues to be a primary transshipment point for cocaine shipments to the United States. The available data suggest that the supply of drugs entering the United States via Central America remains virtually uninterrupted. Law enforcement officials report that drug traffickers have adjusted their modes of operations to evade air interdiction efforts and are increasingly using sea and land transportation, which is very difficult to detect, to move drugs through Central America to the United States. Although several United States Government agencies are working with some Central American countries on small projects to address these new modes of trafficking, the outcome of these efforts is uncertain due to the limited capabilities of host countries and shifts in the United States program emphasis from drug interdiction in the transit countries toward intercepting drugs and disrupting drug organizations in the source countries of South America. Appended background and methodological information, results, tables, and list of related reports
Main Term(s): International drug law enforcement
Index Term(s): Central America; Drug Policy; Drug smuggling; Foreign policies; International cooperation; Police effectiveness
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=151620

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