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NCJ Number: 151721 Find in a Library
Title: Resiliency and Risk Among Young People of Color
Author(s): P Rode
Corporate Author: The Urban Coalition
United States of America
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 38
Sponsoring Agency: National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
The Urban Coalition
St Paul, MN 55114
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

The Urban Coalition
2610 University Avenue West
Suite 201
St Paul, MN 55114
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: Using data from 13,000 adolescents who responded to the University of Minnesota's Adolescent Health Survey, this study explored the issue of resiliency, defined here as the capacity of young people to be emotionally healthy and to avoid destructive behavior even under difficult circumstances. The adolescents were divided by ethnic group (black, American Indian, Asian, Latino, and white).
Abstract: Three outcomes of emotion and behavior were used: emotional stress, suicide risk, and delinquency. The findings showed that youths in all five ethnic groups were vulnerable to emotional stress when three factors were present: boredom, negative feelings about their bodies, and anxiety about violence. Strong family relations reduced emotional stress in all five groups. High emotional stress was the strongest predictor of suicide risk among youth in all ethnic groups. Contributing variables that differed among groups included physical abuse, school performance, and religiosity. Two of the most powerful contributors to lower levels of delinquency were gender and age. In some ethnic groups, parents' substance use and family emotional or mental health problems appeared to contribute to higher rates of delinquency. 4 tables, 7 notes, and 2 appendixes
Main Term(s): Juveniles
Index Term(s): Adolescents at risk; Ethnic groups; Juvenile delinquency factors; Juvenile suicide; Mental health; Minnesota
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=151721

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