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NCJRS Abstract

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NCJ Number: 152505 Find in a Library
Title: California's Juvenile Probation Camps: A Validation Study, Executive Summary
Author(s): T Palmer; R Wedge
Corporate Author: California Dept of the Youth Authority
United States of America
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 13
Sponsoring Agency: California Dept of the Youth Authority
Sacramento, CA 95823
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
Sale Source: California Dept of the Youth Authority
4241 Williamsborough Drive
Sacramento, CA 95823
United States of America

National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Survey
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This analysis of California's juvenile probation camps confirmed findings from research conducted in 1984-89 revealing that the State's county juvenile probation camp system provides public protection and that several types of camps have recidivism and State commitment rates that are significantly lower than those in other camps.
Abstract: The followup study focused on 2,140 randomly selected males who were released in 1984 and were followed for 24 months. Results revealed that the California system not only incarcerates and incapacitates juvenile delinquents but also reduces delinquent behavior during the 24-month followup period. The camp system also provides institutional programs for some youths who, in the absence of local camps and alternatives to those camps, would probably be committed to State institutions. More successful camps were often, but not always, smaller and less crowded than other camps. Youths were housed in individual rooms rather than dormitories and were assigned to programs on a relatively individualized basis. These camps also offered higher-than-average amounts of counseling, academic training, physical activities, and community contact. Appended table and 7 references
Main Term(s): Juvenile Corrections/Detention effectiveness
Index Term(s): California; Juvenile offender forestry camps; Juvenile probation
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=152505

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