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NCJ Number: 152875 Add to Shopping cart Find in a Library
Title: What Strategies Will Mid-Sized Police Agencies Use to Address Southeast Asian and Hispanic Gangs by the Year 2004?
Author(s): J Gomes
Corporate Author: California Cmssn on Peace Officer Standards and Training
United States of America
Date Published: 1994
Page Count: 142
Sponsoring Agency: California Cmssn on Peace Officer Standards and Training
Sacramento, CA 95816
National Institute of Justice/
Rockville, MD 20849
NCJRS Photocopy Services
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
POST Media Distribution Ctr
Sacramento, CA 95816
Publication Number: 18-0372
Sale Source: National Institute of Justice/
NCJRS paper reproduction
Box 6000, Dept F
Rockville, MD 20849
United States of America

NCJRS Photocopy Services
Box 6000
Rockville, MD 20849-6000
United States of America

POST Media Distribution Ctr
1601 Alhambra Boulevard
Sacramento, CA 95816
United States of America
Document: PDF
Type: Thesis/Dissertation
Language: English
Country: United States of America
Annotation: This research project examined the current and projected growth of ethnic street gangs in California, particularly Southeast Asian and Hispanic gangs, and assessed the response of medium-sized police agencies to gangs.
Abstract: The futures study determined that medium-sized police agencies have not been effective in responding to gangs, primarily because they typically focus on suppression rather than on prevention and intervention. A nominal group technique panel was employed to forecast trends in gang activities and police responses. Three main trends were analyzed: (1) level of Southeast Asian and Hispanic populations; (2) ability of police agencies to finance resources with public funds; and (3) number of serious crimes attributed to street gangs. The following future events were also evaluated: the U.S. Supreme Court declares interagency gang intelligence files illegal; street gangs become an organized political block in State elections; and Federal immigration law enforcement terminates. Future scenarios were postulated to evaluate the police role in gang prevention. A strategic plan was developed based on a community approach to gang prevention and the development of pro-youth principles and techniques in individual neighborhoods. Followup research is suggested to assess the future effectiveness of mobilizing police and community resources to implement gang suppression strategies. Appendixes include key forecasting data and results. References, endnotes, tables, and figures
Main Term(s): Gangs
Index Term(s): Asian Americans; Asian gangs; California; Future of policing; Future trends; Gang Prevention; Hispanic Americans; Municipal police; Police effectiveness; Trend analysis
To cite this abstract, use the following link:
http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=152875

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